Dyslexia Legislation Passed in Ohio

On December 19, 2011, in IDA, MSL, Ohio, by Dare

Dyslexia Legislation Passed in Ohio

By Charlotte G. Andrist, Ph.D., NCSP, President, IDA Central Ohio Branch

House Bills (HB) 96 and 157 were passed by the Ohio Senate with the concurrence of the Ohio House during a late-night, end-of-the-year Statehouse session on December 14; both bills are expected to be signed into law by Governor Kasich before Christmas. HB 96 (Celeste – D & Brenner – R) has two components. The law will: 1) place the IDA definition of dyslexia directly into Ohio statute. Current Ohio law lists dyslexia as a specific learning disability, consistent with IDEA 2004, but does not provide a definition of dyslexia; and 2) begin a 3-year pilot program for the early identification and remediation of students at-risk for dyslexia and other phonologically based reading disorders. HB 157 (Schuring – R & Letson – D) also has two components. The law will: 1) define a dyslexia specialist as someone who has achieved training consistent with the Level II IDA Knowledge and Practice Standards; and 2) give Educational Service Centers (Ohio’s statewide network of inservice training facilities) and other educational institutions permission to hire a dyslexia specialist to provide professional development in the area of dyslexia for Ohio teachers and administrators. Many thanks to all of those who have worked so diligently to make this dyslexia legislation a reality, including Stephanie Gordan, Martha Chiodi, Pam Kanfer and many others in the Ohio Dyslexia Group. A special thank-you goes to Janis Mitchell (HB 96) and Rebecca Tolson (HB 157) for the lobbying efforts that got these two legislative initiatives started.

For a video of the bill passing, click through to the International Dyslexia Association site.

    KUCHING: The Dyslexia Association of Sarawak (DAS) will not let any constraints hinder children with learning difficulties from getting a proper education.

    Welfare, Women and Family Development Minister Datuk Fatimah Abdullah who is DAS advisor said the state was found lacking when it came to intervention to help dyslexic children…

    “This was among the things we agreed on in today’s meeting, and with this kind of arrangement, we believe children with dyslexia can be identified earlier. As we all know, dyslexia is different from other learning difficulties as it requires very specific intervention method,” she said.

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    Developmental reading disorder, or dyslexia, occurs when there is a problem in areas of the brain that help interpret language.

    It is not caused by vision problems. The disorder is a specific information processing problem that does not interfere with one’s ability to think or to understand complex ideas. Most people suffering from dyslexia have normal intelligence, and many have above-average intelligence. This may appear in combination with developmental writing disorder and developmental arithmetic disorder. All of these involve using symbols to convey information. These conditions may appear alone or in any combination. Dyslexia is a genetic disorder, which may run in the families.

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    One’s intelligence appears unrelated to the specific brain pattern that causes dyslexia, researchers reported Thursday. The findings are important because they suggest that IQ shouldn’t be considered by education specialists when diagnosing dyslexia. In fact, doing say may bar some children from receiving special education services to improve reading comprehension.

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